news in brief

EthiopiaEthiopia
Japanese Funded Water Supply, Sanitation Project Goes Operational

By Henok Tibebu
Japanese funded water supply and sanitation project in Tsayte Woreda of Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples State worth over 600,000 USD was inaugurated December 5, 2016.

At the inauguration ceremony, Embassy Second Secretary Yohei Otomo said the project would improve access to safe water and sanitation for the community.

According to embassy press release, the project provided three water points, 31 washhouses and five restrooms. Training focusing on sanitation was also offered for beneficiaries. Members of the community have also expressed gratitude to the embassy for accessing the clean water.

The government of Japan has provided over one million USD to support education, water supply, health and other sectors in Ethiopia implementing the Grant Assistance Scheme throughout the last five years, the release stated.

GabonGabon
The tone rises between the State and Veolia

SEEG, a subsidiary of Veolia in Gabon, claims 172,000 drinking water customers and 394,600 electricity customers. © www.veolia.comSEEG, a subsidiary of Veolia in Gabon, claims 172,000 drinking water customers and 394,600 electricity customers. © www.veolia.com

SEEG, a subsidiary of Veolia and a concession operator of the country’s water and electricity network since 1997, publicly complained on December 20, 2016 about the State and private defaults that could lead it to put the key under the door, According to its director general. A remark coldly received by the government, which must decide in mid-2017 on an opening of the concession to competition.

While negotiations on the renewal of the concession on the water system and electricity Gabonese energy and Water Company of Gabon (SEEG), whose subsidiary of the French group holds since 1997, was opened in July , tone up in Libreville.

GuineaGuinea
The Kaléta dam badly planned?

Guinea

According to sources, the Kalta hydroelectric dam, inaugurated with great pomp by Guinean President Alpha Condé and its Energy Minister Cheick Taliby Sylla at the end of September 2015, does not keep its promises. Its production capacity, assumed to be 240 megawatts (MW), would be between 30 and 100 MW during the dry season. In issue, the lack of anticipation of chronic water shortage.

The situation is partly due to the lack of water reservoir upstream - which will be settled around 2020 - but also to “technical errors” during the study phase of this site built by China International Water and Electric Corporation for $ 446 million (€ 420 million). Moreover, the question of whether the power grid is powerful enough to extract the energy produced divides the experts.

KenyaKenya
Advocating for Sanitation at the Kenya Water Week

L-R) Prof. Tibaijuka (Head of WSSCC Delegation, Hon. Wamalwa (Cabinet Secretary Ministry of Water & Irrigation and Mr. Reynders (Belgium Deputy Prime Minister), Prof. Segor (Permanent Secretary Ministry of Water & Irrigation)L-R) Prof. Tibaijuka (Head of WSSCC Delegation, Hon. Wamalwa (Cabinet Secretary Ministry of Water & Irrigation and Mr. Reynders (Belgium Deputy Prime Minister), Prof. Segor (Permanent Secretary Ministry of Water & Irrigation)

The first Kenya Water Week was held in Nairobi from 20-25 November 2016, with the theme “From Aid to Trade”. WSSCC and its partners in Kenya participated in the week-long event demonstrating that not only water but also sanitation and hygiene are essential components in improving health, safety and dignity.

The head of the WSSCC delegation, Prof. Anna Tibaijuka, a current member of parliament in Tanzania, previous Chair of WSSCC and former Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director of UN-HABITAT, advocated during the opening session to make sanitation visible at the event. She gave a prominent place to sanitation and hygiene, referring to the unprecedented opportunity of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 6.2 and stressed on the need to focus on people in vulnerable situations, such as women and girls.

MozambiqueMozambique
Africa’s biggest hydropower plant may soon run out of water

Running low. (EPA/Andre Kosters)Running low. (EPA/Andre Kosters)

Drought in southern Africa is threatening electricity generation at Africa’s biggest hydropower plant, the Cahora Bassa dam in Mozambique. Water levels at the reservoir are dangerously low. Cahora Bassa was only 34% full as of the end of November, according to the National Water Directorate.

Pedro Couto, head of the plant, was quoted in November 2016 that a lack of rain over the last two years had “resulted in an unprecedented reduction in the Cahora Bassa reservoir,” according to reports.

Data from the dam’s operator, Hidroelectrica de Cahora Bassa (HCB), show that the dam’s water level is only 17 meters (55 feet) above the minimum operating level. If next year’s rainy season does not deliver higher rainfall, the situation could get worse. Southern Africa is experiencing its worst drought in almost four decades, reducing water flows in the Zambezi river system where three major hydro dams, including the Cahora Bassa, supply electricity to the region.

 

                           


            

Current Issue: Africa Water & Sanitation & Hygiene December 2018 Vol.13 No.6