news in brief

Water for Africa1.3 Million People from Ukambani to Benefit from Thwake Dam

On November 11, 2017, the day after the Global Water Action Day that marked the fourth day of COP23, the “Water for Africa” initiative was the subject of a presentation in the Morocco Pavilion, open to civil society organizations.

“Water for Africa” was established under the auspices of an African COP, COP22 held in Marrakech, at the initiative of Morocco and with the blessing of the African Development Bank, which immediately offered its support.

The Moroccan Secretary of State for Water, Charafat Afilal; the Director of the Water Sciences Division and Secretary of the International Hydrological Programme at UNESCO, Blanca Jiménez-Cisneros, who is also a member of the World Water Council; and Jean-Michel Ossete, Coordinator of the African Water Facility at the African Development Bank (AfDB), jointly chaired this presentation of the initiative, which was celebrating its first anniversary.

KenyaKenya
1.3 Million People from Ukambani to Benefit from Thwake Dam

1.3 Million PeopleNairobi - Some 1.3 million people from the Lower Eastern Region are set to benefit from the Thwake Dam project whose contract was officially signed recently by Water and Irrigation Cabinet Secretary Eugene Wamalwa.

According to Wamalwa, Thwake will be the largest single project in the country and the region, which will be providing 134 million litres of water daily.

“Thwake dam will be 10 times larger than Ndakaini dam and also the largest in East Africa. I want to assure that all the necessary funding of this project is in place to ensure that it goes on as planned,” said Wamalwa.

NigeriaNigeria
108 Million Nigerians Lack Toilet Facilities – UN

108 MillionDespite huge technological, scientific and industrial advances, an estimated 108 million Nigerians still lack access to toilets, the United Nations stated yesterday on this year’s World Toilet Day, on the theme WastewaterCurrently, available data show that 67 percent do not have a decent toilet, 33 percent lack clean water, and 26 percent practice open defecation.

According to WaterAid, Nigeria will only be able to deliver a community source of clean water within a 30-minute round trip to everyone by 2039.

WaterAid is an international non-profit organization set up in 1981 as a response to the UN International Drinking Water & Sanitation decade.

RwandaRwanda
New Water Facilities to Benefit Over 2,000 Bugesera Residents

Rwanda Takayuki Miyashita the Japanese Ambassador to Rwanda together with Priscilla Uwiragiye the Bugesera District vice mayor in charge of social affairs fetching water from a new water tank. Photos by Frederic ByumvuhoreRwanda Takayuki Miyashita the Japanese Ambassador to Rwanda together with Priscilla Uwiragiye the Bugesera District vice mayor in charge of social affairs fetching water from a new water tank. Photos by Frederic ByumvuhoreA total of 30 bamboo water tanks and two water kiosks constructed to ease access to clean and safe water for residents in Bugesera District has been launched.

The US $74,150 (about Rwf62 million) facilities were inaugurated by Takayuki Miyashita, the Japanese ambassador to Rwanda has said.

The facilities were funded by the Embassy of Japan and implemented by Rwanda Environmental Conservation Organization (RECOR) under the project for improvement of access to clean water in the district.

A total of 2, 000 residents from four villages of Musenyi Sector are expected to benefit from the facilities.

Bugesera District is one of the areas with scarcity of water. Residents sometimes resort to fetching water from unsafe sources.

SeychellesSeychelles
New Dams, Exploitation of Groundwater to Increase Potable Water in Seychelles

New Dams Exploitation of Groundwater to Increase Potable Water in SeychellesThe construction of new dams and increased exploitation of groundwater are priority projects to sustain potable water in the Seychelles.

The Public Utilities Corporation said they are exploring the possibilities of constructing new dams in addition to the island nation’s two existing ones.

Speaking to SNA recently, Chief Executive Philippe Morin also said that three sites on Mahe - the main island - and one on La Digue - the third most populated island - have been identified as having the potential for the extraction of groundwater.

The first dam will be constructed at Grand Anse, a district in the west of Mahe. The site - as a potential location for a dam - has been under discussion for a number of years. “We are doing a feasibility study and more importantly we want a design for the site. We have done studies in the past. But with this new one, we want a design which will give us much more details.”

 

                           


            

Current Issue: Africa Water & Sanitation & Hygiene November - December 2017 Vol.12 No.6