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Ramsar COP 12 Adopts Declaration of Punta del Este, 16 Resolutions

Ramsar COP 129 June 2015: The 12th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands (COP 12) agreed on four strategic priorities that link the wise use of wetlands to solving pressing issues, such as climate change and food and water security. Noting the loss of 64% of global wetlands since 1900, the final declaration calls for strengthening partnerships “beyond those responsible for the operation and maintenance of Ramsar Sites and important wetlands,” to enhance the Convention’s implementation.

In total, COP 12 delegates adopted 16 resolutions, including the ‘Declaration of Punta del Este’ that aims to enhance the visibility of the Convention, demonstrate parties’ strong commitment to the new Strategic Plan for 2016-2021, and underline the relationship between wetlands and other global environmental issues.

Exploring the sustainable development potential of sanitation in Africa

By Caspar Trimmer and Linus Dagerskog

Productive sanitation, taken to scale, could be a key to broad-ranging sustainable development in many African countries. An SEI side event at AfricaSan 4 revisited past experiences for lessons on how to make it happen.

Food security and access to decent sanitation and hygiene services are fundamental to healthy and productive lives; but far too many people in low- and middle-income countries lack both. In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) a quarter of the population were undernourished in 2011-2013, 80% have no electricity access, and a staggering 70% – 640 million people – still use substandard sanitation systems or none at all, despite marked improvements in recent years.

Lack of sanitation for 2.4 billion people undermining health improvements - UNICEF, WHO

mdgFinal MDG progress report on water and sanitation released
By WASHplus

Lack of progress on sanitation threatens to undermine the child survival and health benefits from gains in access to safe drinking water, warn WHO and UNICEF in a report tracking access to drinking water and sanitation against the Millennium Development Goals.

The Joint Monitoring Programme report, Progress on Sanitation and Drinking Water: 2015 Update and MDG Assessment, says worldwide, 1 in 3 people, or 2.4 billion, are still without sanitation facilities – including 946 million people who defecate in the open. “What the data really show is the need to focus on inequalities as the only way to achieve sustainable progress,” said Sanjay Wijesekera, head of UNICEF’s global water, sanitation and hygiene programmes.

Davis & Shirtliff Launches Dow High-Tech Water Treatment in the region

Davis Shirtliff together with partner Dow Water Systems recently showcased the latest Dow UltraDavis & Shirtliff together with partner Dow Water Systems recently showcased the latest Dow Ultra Filtration technology to a group of engineers and water industry executives. The technology purifies highly turbid surface waters to drinking standard using a membrane technology without chemicals. Participants are pictured by the plant drinking the treated water to demonstrate the effectiveness of the process! Davis & Shirtliff together with partner Dow Water Systems recently showcased the latest Dow Ultra Filtration technology to a group of engineers and water industry executives. The technology purifies highly turbid surface waters to drinking standard using a membrane technology without chemicals. Participants are pictured by the plant drinking the treated water to demonstrate the effectiveness of the process! Davis and Shirtliff, Kenya’s leading water and energy solutions provider, has unveiled a partnership with international water company Dow Water and Process Solutions that will see the incorporation of high-tech water treatment solutions to meet the need for safe and affordable drinking water.

Dow Water and Process Solutions will provide its high technology Ultra Filtration and Reverse Osmosis products to Davis and Shirtliff, complementing the Kenyan multinational’s offering of unique water solutions for both homes and institutions.

Reverse Osmosis is a technique that uses semi permeable membranes to filter solvents, bacteria and viruses out of water. The membranes remove virtually all dissolved solids and micro-organism from the water rendering it totally pure. It is a process particularly suitable for treating salinity and also has applications in manufacturing where pure water is needed.

Rainwater Harvesting

What is rainwater harvesting?

Rainwater harvesting is the capture and storage of rainwater for landscape irrigation, potable and non-potable indoor use, and storm water abatement. Harvested rainwater can be particularly useful when no other source of water supply is available, or if the available supply is inadequate or of poor quality.

Why is there so much interest of late in rainwater harvesting?

Rainwater harvesting is enjoying a revival in popularity for two reasons: its inherently superior quality and an interest in reducing consumption of treated water. Rainwater has long been valued for its purity and softness. It is slightly acidic, and is free from disinfectant by-products, salts, minerals, and other natural and man-made contaminants. Furthermore, rainwater harvesting is valued as a water conservation tool to reduce demand on more traditional water supply sources.

Water Fund to benefit conservation

A new project that aims to deliver sustained water supply to over 9.3 million people while conserving the environment has been launched today in Kenya.

The project, known as Nairobi Water Fund, has been described as the fi rst in Africa by its implementing partners, and is expected to generate US$21.5 million in long-term benefi ts to Kenyan consumers, farmers and businesses.

It is being implemented through a public-private partnership led by The Nature Conservancy (TNC), which has its headquarters in the United States.

According to TNC, 60 per cent of Nairobi’s residents lack access to a reliable water supply, with the problem expected to become worse through unpredictable rainfall resulting from climate change.

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypts President Abdul Fattah al Sisi left signed the deal despiteEgypt’s President Abdul Fattah al-Sisi (left) signed the deal, despite expressing reservationsThree African leaders have signed an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa’s biggest hydroelectric dam, in Ethiopia.

The leaders of Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan signed the agreement in Sudan’s capital, Khartoum. Egypt has opposed the Great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, saying it would worsen its water shortages. Ethiopia says the dam will give it a fairer share of Nile waters.

In 2013, Ethiopia’s parliament ratifi ed a controversial treaty to replace colonial-era agreements that gave Egypt and Sudan the biggest share of the Nile’s water.

Egypt’s then-President Mohamed Morsi said he did not want war but he would not allow Egypt’s water supply to be endangered by the dam.

 

                           


            

Current Issue: Africa Water & Sanitation & Hygiene March-April 2017 Vol.12 No.2